August 2014: New Riddle!

My Arctic August is going by very well, despite the fact that the environment where I am has not been conducive for immersion, or for making videos.
Despite this difficult setup, I can now hold conversations in Greenlandic with fair frequency, but I feel that my reading ability isn’t where I want it to be. As for Northern Sami, the same situation is to be found, but slightly in favor of reading and less so of speaking.
I confess to having an inability to focus on one project at a time. Therefore, in addition to Northern Sami I was rehearsing its siblings as well. By “siblings” I mean Finnish and Estonian.
One thing that really helped me with the Scandinavian Languages were the fact that I used my inability focus on one language at a time to my advantage, and improved the lot of them together, although it took a good degree of mental gymnastics to do so.
I decided to do the same with the trio of Finnish, Northern Sami, and Estonian, which are more distantly related than Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian are.
Unfortunately, because I got really lazy, my Hebrew skills have been taking a toll, and while my understanding remains sharp I feel that my conversational abilities have plummeted. My new list reflects that, but luckily next week—my new graduate program begins! JTS’ Hebrew programs will definitely help me in that regard.
For French: despite my trip to Paris, I find myself a bit challenged. As someone who has a deep rebellious side, I find it difficult to have “chemistry” with a very commonly studied language. But Duolingo isn’t going away and I will put in some nominal effort until I start to reap results.
The understudied Faroese Language, on the other hand, is going by very well! I found the most perfect course on Memrise imaginable for me, and thanks to my new phone purchase, I have been attending to my obsessions whenever I find myself needing to wait for something.
It has taught me a LOT about the more modern Scandinavian Languages (who knew that “ingen” [no one, none] and “ej” [none] were related via Old Norse?). The pronunciation, like that of Danish and French, I had been learning by means of hearing words and putting the rules together.
When the Inuit difficulties of Greenlandic made me want to throw my phrasebook across the other end of the room, or close my browser window in frustration, I would often turn to Faroese for something easier. The vocabulary doesn’t pose a problem as virtually everything is a compound word or a piece of one, and it really helps enforce my other Scandinavian vocabularies (and teach me more than a few new words in the process).
Getting a Faroese accent is a bit difficult, but I think I may need to dabble in an Icelandic one to fully realize the difference and make it more distinctly “Faroese”.
Now, I realized at one point that I may need to drop some of my languages just because I may not realistically have time to practice them all. I did find a way around it, however, and I’ll explain it when I reveal my new language dabbling.
Here are your hints:
• This language is the official language of a country, but not the only language with this status.
• This language is also an official language of a part of said country
• This language is endangered
• Judging from the FSI’s standards, this would be very easy for an English speaker to learn (although I do have problems using “hard” and “easy” to describe language projects or languages in general).
• The language is very closely related to some of the most popularly studied languages.
• The language’s name sounds very close to an adjective used to describe its classification.
• On paper, the most common language in the area where it is spoken is one that is on my list already (it is one that I know well)

Next week I move to New York, and I really hope to improve and maintain my various projects by means of its countless inhabitants!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s