My Small Stimulating Samiland: Lessons from Immersion

Last week, during my home visit, I dedicated a handful of hours to speaking nothing else aside from Northern Sami, with my phrasebook in one hand and Giellatekno within reach. The only person who was present at the time was my mother, and I agreed to not avoid English in public (in the event that something needed to be purchased) nor would I refrain from writing it.
Due to time constraints, no video was made, but here are some of my observations:
(1) The Dual Pronouns and Conjugations in Northern Sami weren’t particularly strange after a significant amount of usage. Back when I first started, I had to constantly remind myself not to use “mii” instead of “moai” when there were only two people involved. Given as there was only one other person on the premises during my immersion scheme, I had learned to block the plural pronouns out of my mind completely, except when talking about a peer group or so.

(2) An important thing I noticed is that the language wasn’t about painful grammar tables any more. I had a quick reference in my notebook that I had used for ensuring that I got verbs correct.

After a while, I realized that the most important thing for memorizing the contents of a table wasn’t looking at the table and trying to memorize it (this toxic habit may have been in part due to my having studied Classics in college…a table-memorization binge is certainly not helpful with living languages at all!)

What you must do instead, however, is use the language, if only by talking to yourself, and thereby inculcate the grammatical systems into your conscious in this manner.

This will be particularly helpful later on when I focus more on Faroese, which has a notorious grammar system closer to that of ancient languages. I’m not afraid, however, because now I know exactly what to do! And so do you, for that matter!

(3) I remember giving my Greenlandic phrasebook to someone back when I lived in Heidelberg. He proceeded to take a look through it, and his immediate observation was this:

“It is interesting that, instead of words like “house” and “computer” they have words for, like, “kayak” and “polar bear”. (the fact is, “house” and “computer” did also exist in the book, just not in the first few pages…)

What does this have to do with my little Samiland? Well…in my book, there are two pages devoted to reindeer-related vocabulary, one of the unique features of the Northern Sami Language (and possibly the other Sami Languages? Can anyone help me here?)

I don’t particularly need reindeer related vocabulary when living in an American suburb. Not right now, at least…

Similarly, Giellatekno’s dictionary, the Freelang dictionary, Sami Wikipedia, and the phrasebook all failed to offer any word in Northern Sami for “dolphin”. Therefore, I opted for some vague corruption of Finnish “delfiini” (I cannot remember exactly what I said).

This is something that just simply does not occur with more commonly spoken languages.

One reason I decided to start this blog was because I knew that I would be entering territory that almost no one had entered. Therefore, it is my duty to share these experiences.

(4) Asked to describe Ođđasat (the Sami News Channel) at a party yesterday, I related the following:

“Picture this: Person speaking in Swedish with Northern Sami voiceovers and Norwegian Subtitles”.

My language filter can sometimes have significant problems with this “Kauderwelsch”, even with Swedish and Norwegian being very close to each other.

Therefore, I primarily opted to focus on speaking rather than media in order to hone my skills, because I fear that, more often than not, getting material in 100% Sami is just simply not going to happen (hopefully the future will change this). Even on Kringvarp Føroya (the Faroese Media Service) this is a bit of an issue with Danish spokespeople frequently appearing (although, very interestingly, Greenlandic TV is usually kept in one language at a time).

(5) The very fact that I had devoted time to this endeavor made me excited for the day in which I may end up visiting Samiland. It is difficult to explain the connectionthat I feel toward the land and this culture, I suppose that attraction to cultures and hobbies just cannot be explained at times…

…regardless, there are some language journeys of mine that I have slowed down or sometimes stopped altogether, but this is one that I am very much intent on continuing.

Coming later on this week: a software surprise!

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