“How Do You Get the Time for That?” My Secret: Revealed!

 

STA_4339

A clock in Napoli that is actually a “weathervane”

The List of my languages  is long enough that I usually forget one or two when listing them from memory. Not only that, I sometimes carry a napkin around me with the list, just in case I get asked that dreaded question again.
So that you know, I get asked it about as often as what my name is. But being as the question usually follows when I mention something about an understudied language (anything from Dutch to Northern Sami in terms of cultural breadth qualifies in this regard as “understudied” in my book).
This is my last post on this blog when I am living in Heidelberg (there will probably be a lot fewer posts for the next few weeks), and so I decided to ask a question that usually follows:
“What? How do you even have the time for all of that? Do you even sleep?”
Or something along those lines…
Well, I answer the question as directly as I can when I receive it, and I’ll answer said question directly right now:
We all require some form of entertainment, some down-time. There has to be some time spent doing something positively silly—not exactly a guilty pleasure (although those certainly exist, too!), but some areas of the time budget that make it clear that no one person can spend all of his or her time working.
I realized this one fine day on my travels, although I cannot remember exactly where or when:
What would happen if I use all of this downtime for the purpose of maintaining my languages? Instead of silly YouTube browsing in English, I could very well do it in any other language that I know, or, even better, one that I am learning to a significant degree.
That way, even my down-time serves a purpose.
Then the response usually comes, “well, that means that you can’t always understand all of the downtime TV time, can you? It just isn’t the same”.
True, but here’s something that I have noticed:
When I tried watching many of the same genres (children’s shows, animated movies, etc.) in English (or, in many cases, the English original), I didn’t feel as though they had the magic completely intact…
I associated the English language with most of my life. I associate it with my college education, and my struggles and gains for the first twenty years of my life or so.
It wasn’t always like that, however.
I remember when I was a child, getting exposed to bright characters and enchanted worlds on a daily basis, usually through some television screen (or home video). I didn’t understand every word of English then, the way that can most certainly be said about my present self.
Likewise, this downtime television enables me not only to maintain languages but also to relive my alternate-universe childhood many times over.
I’ve noticed that sometimes with certain languages that I know very well (mostly those that are on the top of my list), that I don’t particularly enjoy watching the downtime-television in them, unless I can feel my control of these languages slipping away, in which case I can savor it to relive earlier stages of my learning process.
There is so much time spent watching television and leisure activities—and this is true for many, if not all, of us. However, this leisure can also serve a purpose.
And if you’re wondering how I have the time to maintain a lot of these language projects, now you know.
And now you can do the same for your own world with little worlds.

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